Posts tagged sodium

Here’s a set of lyrics to shift your brain to knots within knots on some fundamentals of chemistry. This would have been choice for those classes in 10th grade if I had to take them over again.

I can do anything

Neutron, proton, mass effect, lyrical oxidation, yo irrelevant
Mass spectrograph, your electron volt, atomic energy erupting
As I get all open on betatron, gamma rays thermo cracking
Cyclotron and any and every mic
You’re on trans iridium, if you’re always uranium
Molecules, spontaneous combustion, pow

Law of de-fi-nite pro-por-tion, gain-ing weight
I’m every element of brown

Lead, gold, tin, iron, platinum, zinc, when I rap you think
Iodine nitrate activate
Red geranium, the only difference is I transmit sound
Balance was unbalanced then you add a little talent and….


I like how they describe the proboscis of the moth as being a “fearsome harpoon”. Heh. Makes me wish I had a proboscis if I was in trouble.

madagascan moth

A species of moth drinks tears from the eyes of sleeping birds using a fearsome proboscis shaped like a harpoon, scientists have revealed. The new discovery – spied in Madagascar – is the first time moths have been seen feeding on the tears of birds.

Roland Hilgartner at the German Primate Centre in Göttingen, Germany, and Mamisolo Raoilison Hilgartner at the University of Antananarivo in Madagascar, witnessed the apparently unique sight in the island state’s Kirindy forest.

Tear-feeding moths and butterflies are known to exist elsewhere in Africa, Asia and South America, but they mainly feed on large, placid animals, such as deer, antelope or crocodiles, which cannot readily brush them away. But there are no such large animals on Madagascar. The main mammals – lemurs and mongoose – have paws capable of shooing the moths. Birds can fly away.

But not when they are sleeping. The Madagascan moths were observed on the necks of sleeping magpie robins and Newtonia birds, with the tip of their proboscises inserted under the bird’s eyelid, drinking avidly . This was during the wet season, so the scientists think the insects wanted salt, as the local soils are low in sodium.