crop circles in chungnam boryoung, south korea

A strange pattern appeared in a field in South Korea this past weekend. It hasn’t been determined at this time whether the formation is man-made or unexplainable in origin. What is fascinating about this particular shape is its resemblance to the lunar cycles of the year, which is further explained below.

chungnam boryoung crop circle

chungnam boryoung crop circle

chungnam boryoung crop circle

A new crop picture which appeared in South Korea on June 12, 2008 seems to be a close conceptual copy of the “four month lunar calendar” which appeared at East Field near Avebury on July 7, 2007.

(see www.lucypringle.co.uk/photos/2007/uk2007ay.shtml#pic4)

Now in 2008 we are seeing two lunar phase cycles rather than four, as indicated by two long series of small white balls which have been drawn as large for a full Moon or else small for a new Moon:

chungnam boryoung crop circle

chungnam boryoung crop circle

Our Moon will be “full” on June 19, 2008 then again on July 18, 2008. Several parts of those two lunar cycles actually overlap: from June 25 to 27 (upper left) before a new Moon on July 3, then again from July 10 to 12 after a new Moon on July 3 (lower right). The two figure-8 shapes which have been drawn there are known astronomically as “analemmas”

(see www.analemma.com
or www.pikespeakphoto.com/analemma.html
or en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analemma).

Each figure-8 shape represents the location in our sky of some nearby astronomical object (say Sun or Moon), when viewed at the same time each day over the course of an entire year. That is also why a broad outer circle which represents Earth’s annual orbit about the Sun was drawn there: in order to emphasize “one full solar year” of four seasons (light for six months of summer, then dark for six months of winter). The analemma shape of our Sun is relatively easy to photograph:

chungnam boryoung crop circle

By contrast, the analemma shape of our Moon is relatively hard to photograph (see apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap050713.html), because any new Moon (upper left) appears faint versus a full Moon (lower right):

chungnam boryoung crop circle

That is also how we know that those mysterious crop artists were telling us about the “Moon” on June 12 in South Korea, and not about the “Sun”, because the round white balls as shown there vary greatly in size from small to large, in direct proportion to the Moon’s intensity throughout any 29.5-day phase cycle.

Every effort should be made to determine whether the new Korean crop picture is real or else human-made, by careful inspection of the flattened plants there. A lot of hard science for a fake!

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